Building Armory From Source – Bitcoin Armory – Python ...

Introducing BitcoinOS - Linux distro with several Bitcoin wallets included

Hi people, I just released a Linux distro with several Bitcoin wallets pre-installed.
Features of BitcoinOS 0.1 (Alpha 1):
Links:
This is still alpha/experimental, so it is not completely user-friendly and there is not yet a lot of documentation, but it is usable.
Note: I'm the lead developer (proof), feel free to ask me any questions
submitted by david73wood to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Armory is Now in the Official Debian Unstable (Sid) Repositories (and Ubuntu Vivid)

Armory is Now in the Official Debian Unstable (Sid) Repositories (and Ubuntu Vivid) submitted by josephbisch to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Getting frustrated with Ubuntu. Are my experiences the norm for a Linux user?

Let me start off by saying that I'm not a total newb, but still pretty green. I like to believe I'm capable with computers, and know enough to figure out most issues. I also have a pretty solid general understanding of how they function. Been a Windows user most of my life, but decided to make the switch to Linux a few years back.
My experiences thus far are making me reconsider the switch, despite the fact that I've really become opposed to using Windows. I'm curious if I should expect more of the same indefinitely, or if my experiences up to this point are unusual, and I should expect to reach a point where I can just use the OS, instead of spend hours trying to perform every task.
It all started when I downloaded Ubuntu about three years ago. I easily got it installed as a dual boot on a Windows machine. Had to start by allocating disk space in Windows for the new Linux install, prepared a live usb, went through the install, cake. Then I started trying to do stuff, like use a printer. Well HP doesn't make a driver for Linux and, probably, 2-4 hours of research led to me still not having a working printer. I found a driver, but the process to get it installed did not work as it was supposed to. I forget the specifics, but I followed a tutorial to the T, but ran into unforeseen installation issues, and never could figure out how to get the process complete.
After that I started running into issues with the FireFox browser. I've alwasy used FF on Windows with no issues. On Ubuntu it ran slower than dial-up from the mid-90's. Again, 2-4 hours worth of research and several changes to things like FF settings, disabling add-ons, etc., and I still had no fix.
Still I wasn't deterred. Then the dual boot broke. I tried boot repair. No dice. Tried for several hours to get it working. Asked about it on forums, sent in results of boot repair (where I forget) only to get no response, and finally I threw in the towel.
I also struggled to get Bitcoin Armory working, with some very frustrating success, but I didn't count that against Linux, since it was very new software, and I wasn't surprised it was buggy.
Fast forward to today. I've been using Windows for a couple years, with few attempts made to use Linux, except for trying to retrieve a very small amount of BTC from Armory, which consumed about three weekends of my life to finally achieve.
Now I've decided to give it another go. I downloaded UbuntuStudio b/c I'd like to use some of the music production software that comes with it.
Following some tutorials online, I tried to connect my midi keyboard to the computer using QJackCtl. I couldn't remember the issue that I ran into when starting to type this up, so I tried to repeat the process, only to have the program crash during start up, three times. The computer had literally just restarted 20 minutes ago, so I doubt a reboot would work, but maybe. It's almost funny at this point. I'm really disappointed that I can't get the audio software that came with the distro working "fresh out of the box." Maybe with a few hours, or weekends, worth of research?
I've also been getting a system error message every time I login. I posted a query on the Ubuntu forums. That issue has yet to be sorted out.
I hesitate to include this next part, because it involves software that is really still in it's early stages, and I'm trying to be realistic in taking the perspective that any problems I encounter are with the new software, not Ubuntu, but the fact that I had zero problems getting the same stuff to work in Windows just adds to my frustration with Ubuntu.
Everything I'm about to describe is involved with installing monero mining and wallet software. The exception is the AMD drivers needed for the GPU I'm using to mine. Those I expected to work without issue. I followed the directions for installing the AMD drivers for Ubuntu on the AMD website, and the program would not work. After, you guessed it, 2-4 hours of research, I finally, almost by accident, installed an older version of the driver software. Boom, it worked. WTF man?! When I installed the Windows version it took 2 minutes.
Moving on, I tried getting the xmr-stak mining software working. This took me several hours, spread over several days to sort out. Same with the monero-gui wallet, which actually I've only got half-way working. In fact, I've tried installing the monero-gui by two different ways. In the process I've inadvertently got the monerod daemon running, but not the gui. Actually, the monerod daemon starts with the computer and I haven't even started trying to figure out how to turn that off, since what's the point of having it run if I can't use the gui?
In Windows I had all of this up and running in a couple of hours. And in saying that I'm prepared for the "if you like Windows so much then use that!" or "you're just too thick to figure it out!", but I don't like Windows, and I don't think it's a matter of not figuring it out. It seems to me that the reason I've spent dozens of hours just trying to get things to work in Linux is that nearly every time I've tried to do something, there is inevatably some error along the way where following the directions isn't good enough, and sorting out the issue is a feat in and of itself.
I just want to know if this is unusual, or if this is how it's going to go forever if I keep using Linux. Is my experience typical?
TL;DR: I've had a litany of issues and spent countless hours trying to fix them using Linux. Is this rare, and I've just had an unusual experience, or actually pretty common, and I should just accept it as the cost of using an open source OS?
submitted by rtfioeti to Ubuntu [link] [comments]

[Reupload][Tutorial] Install Armory Wallet 0.96.4 on Fedora Workstation 29

note: I had to reupload this because reddit is banning my original account for no reason. I appealed but I thought maybe someone wanted to have this content online.
Armory is a very cool open source bitcoin wallet for the power user. You can do neat things with it, read here: https://www.bitcoinarmory.com/
Disclaimer: follow these steps at your own risk. I am not responsible for any damage / loss of funds you might face for following or not following correctly my instructions here. I may have made a typo somewhere or be wrong so do your own research and learn for yourself what I am doing at each step, and what consequences may have for you, at your own risk. These instructions may be wrong somewhere. It worked for me, it doesn't mean it has to work for you.
Requirements for this tutorial:
We are going to build the code from source.
Install dependencies.
I followed these instructions to find the equivalent Fedora packages:
Open the terminal app and run this command:
sudo dnf install git nano qt qt-devel python-devel libtool pyqt4 pyqt4-devel lmdb swig 
And more python packages that I had to install:
sudo pip install twisted qt4reactor psutil 
Importing the signing key to verify the software
Install KGPG to easily manage keys.
sudo dnf install kgpg 
Go to
https://keyserver.ubuntu.com/pks/lookup?op=get&search=0x8C5211764922589A
and copy paste the code below the title from
-----BEGIN PGP PUBLIC KEY BLOCK-----
to
-----END PGP PUBLIC KEY BLOCK-----
both included. Then open KGPG from terminal with
kgpg -k 
and click 'Import Key...' > Clipboard > Ok . You should see a confirmation message. Double check the info and close the dialog.
Repeat the process with this other key:
https://keyserver.ubuntu.com/pks/lookup?op=get&search=0xA4FC919E85C595BA
You can verify both keys are mentioned at the Armory webpage.
Clone and compile the code plus some edits
Before, we installed some dependencies that are named differently than the equivalent Ubuntu/Debian package specified at the Armory documentation. The build process fails for Fedora as the name for the dependency during checks won't match the Fedora version. There's this pull request addressing that, but the code is not part of any release yet.
So the fastest workaround (maybe a bit dirty) was to edit the build config file and correct the name for my Fedora install. Let's begin.
Clone the Armory repository
git clone https://github.com/goatpig/BitcoinArmory.git 
Enter the BitcoinArmory dir
cd BitcoinArmory 
Switch to release code
git checkout 'v0.96.4' 
Verify commit signature
git tag -v 'v0.96.4' 
you should see the following message:
> object fee1f91a3137ef1056e15cc606a186b0e508f84c > type commit > tag v0.96.4 > tagger goatpig  1522530739 +0200 > > v0.96.4 > gpg: Signature made Sat 31 Mar 2018 11:12:19 PM CEST > gpg: using RSA key 8C5211764922589A > gpg: Good signature from "goatpig (Offline signing key for Armory releases) " > gpg: WARNING: This key is not certified with a trusted signature! > gpg: There is no indication that the signature belongs to the owner. > Primary key fingerprint: 745D 707F BA53 968B DF63 AA8D 8C52 1176 4922 589A 
if it looks the same, everything is ok.
Edit the file 'Makefile' file with
gedit Makefile 
And click the three dot menu > Find and Replace...
Configure the options as follows:
https://i.imgur.com/hpS01Kd.png
Click Replace All and close.
Go back to the terminal and run the following commands in order from inside the BitcoinArmory dir. Wait for the previous one to finish before running the next one:
./autogen.sh 
...
./configure 
...
make 
if everything finishes without error you are all done! Run this to start Armory:
python ./ArmoryQt.py 
you are all set. Please let me know if I missed something.
submitted by RedditShadowbangedMe to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

[Tutorial] Install Armory Wallet 0.96.4 on Fedora Workstation 29

Armory is a very cool open source bitcoin wallet for the power user. You can do neat things with it, read here: https://www.bitcoinarmory.com/
Disclaimer: follow these steps at your own risk. I am not responsible for any damage / loss of funds you might face for following or not following correctly my instructions here. I may have made a typo somewhere or be wrong so do your own research and learn for yourself what I am doing at each step, and what consequences may have for you, at your own risk. These instructions may be wrong somewhere. It worked for me, it doesn't mean it has to work for you.
Requirements for this tutorial:
We are going to build the code from source.
Install dependencies.
I followed these instructions to find the equivalent Fedora packages:
Open the terminal app and run this command:
sudo dnf install git nano qt qt-devel python-devel libtool pyqt4 pyqt4-devel lmdb swig 
And more python packages that I had to install:
sudo pip install twisted qt4reactor psutil 
Importing the signing key to verify the software
Install KGPG to easily manage keys.
sudo dnf install kgpg 
Go to
https://keyserver.ubuntu.com/pks/lookup?op=get&search=0x8C5211764922589A
and copy paste the code below the title from
-----BEGIN PGP PUBLIC KEY BLOCK-----
to
-----END PGP PUBLIC KEY BLOCK-----
both included. Then open KGPG from terminal with
kgpg -k 
and click 'Import Key...' > Clipboard > Ok . You should see a confirmation message. Double check the info and close the dialog.
Repeat the process with this other key:
https://keyserver.ubuntu.com/pks/lookup?op=get&search=0xA4FC919E85C595BA
You can verify both keys are mentioned at the Armory webpage.
Clone and compile the code plus some edits
Before, we installed some dependencies that are named differently than the equivalent Ubuntu/Debian package specified at the Armory documentation. The build process fails for Fedora as the name for the dependency during checks won't match the Fedora version. There's this pull request addressing that, but the code is not part of any release yet.
So the fastest workaround (maybe a bit dirty) was to edit the build config file and correct the name for my Fedora install. Let's begin.
Clone the Armory repository
git clone https://github.com/goatpig/BitcoinArmory.git 
Enter the BitcoinArmory dir
cd BitcoinArmory 
Switch to release code
git checkout 'v0.96.4' 
Verify commit signature
git tag -v 'v0.96.4' 
you should see the following message:
> object fee1f91a3137ef1056e15cc606a186b0e508f84c > type commit > tag v0.96.4 > tagger goatpig  1522530739 +0200 > > v0.96.4 > gpg: Signature made Sat 31 Mar 2018 11:12:19 PM CEST > gpg: using RSA key 8C5211764922589A > gpg: Good signature from "goatpig (Offline signing key for Armory releases) " > gpg: WARNING: This key is not certified with a trusted signature! > gpg: There is no indication that the signature belongs to the owner. > Primary key fingerprint: 745D 707F BA53 968B DF63 AA8D 8C52 1176 4922 589A 
if it looks the same, everything is ok.
Edit the file 'Makefile' file with
gedit Makefile 
And click the three dot menu > Find and Replace...
Configure the options as follows:
https://i.imgur.com/hpS01Kd.png
Click Replace All and close.
Go back to the terminal and run the following commands in order from inside the BitcoinArmory dir. Wait for the previous one to finish before running the next one:
./autogen.sh 
...
./configure 
...
make 
if everything finishes without error you are all done! Run this to start Armory:
python ./ArmoryQt.py 
you are all set. Please let me know if I missed something.
edit: cd git dir.
submitted by AmbitiousSpeed0 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Linux Live USB help needed.

Can't buy a Ledger or trezor now.
To be a bit safer, I tried using an ubuntu live usb and also tried Tails, but I ran into a lot of trouble:
1) Ubuntu live: Cannot install electrum as it will not install python-qt4 and python-pip as needed. Can't install electrum using the orange bag (software center or something like this).
2) Ubuntu live: Cannot install bitcoin armory as well. Downloaded the .deb file, double clicked, clicked install... Nothing happens.
3) Tails: Created Intermediary usb drive, then created permanent one. As I don't trust the preinstalled electrum app (bitcoin and trust on the same sentence is just wrong), I wanted to install it using the commands on electrum site. Not able to install the python-pip.
Can someone help? Is there an easier distro to do this? I would prefer Ubuntu because I trust it more than other distros, but what am I doing wrong?
Cheers.
submitted by cryptosnake to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Colored coin client preview #1 (based on Bitcoin Armory)

I think it's already good enough for people to play with it. (Although certainly it's not ready for anything serious.)
For people who are not familiar with concept, colored coins is a technology which allows people to represent arbitrary tokens (e.g. issue private currencies, stocks, bonds, etc.) using small quantities of bitcoins. It is interesting because it would allow us to create decentralized and secure markets. (As decentralized and secure as Bitcoin itself, at least in theory.) See here.
Notes about current release:
Windows binaries: http://killerstorm.xen.prgmr.com/alex/ArmoryX-0.2.5.zip
There are no Linux binaries, but it's really easy to build it on Ubuntu or Debian:
(Note: if you're already using Armory, it is a good idea to hide you ~/.armory so it won't be seen by this experimental Armory mod. Or, perhaps, just don't run this experimental mod.)
Before you run it, make sure that bitcoind or Bitcoin-Qt is running and fully sync'ed. Armory takes up to 10 minutes to start (this version is slower because it additionally scans for colored transactions) and requires ~ 1 GB of RAM.
At start it will offer to create a wallet, do not enable encryption, otherwise issuing colored coins won't work.
Send some bitcoins to this new wallet, 0.02 BTC is probably enough to issue some colored coins and to pay for tx fees.
There is a drop down to choose color. Balance is displayed for a currently chosen color (i.e. if you chose TESTcc it will show how many TESTcc units this wallet owns), and when you send coins you send coins of that color.
Initially 'uncolored' is selected, it means normal BTC. This drop down also has TESTcc ("test colored coins") and "All colors" (this mode is just for debugging, you cannot send coins in this mode).
Here's what you can do now:
  1. Ask somebody to send you TESTcc. (We want to make it automatic, Satoshi Dice style, but unfortunately that code isn't quite ready.)
  2. Find and install other color definitions.
  3. Issue your own colored coins and send them to somebody who wants them. (LOL.)
Let's start from option #3. There is 'Hallucinate' menu. (It is called 'hallucinate' because colors do not exist on blockchain level, it is a client-side convention.) Choose 'Issue colored coins'. Likely all you need to change is name, but you can tweak satoshi-per-unit and number of units if you want.
When you click Issue it will create a new transaction (using your uncolored BTC) and will create a color definition. Optionally it will also upload your color definition to color definition registry. (This registry runs on my server, it might be down.)
You should note ColorID, this is how other people can refer to these coins (name is ambiguous).
You can now choose this new color in drop down and it will show your balance. (E.g. 1000 units.)
Now you'll perhaps want to send these coins to somebody. That person would need to install your color definition first. If you send colored coins without warning they might be lost, i.e. mixed with uncolored ones. For same reason it makes no sense to send them to wallet which isn't color aware.
For example, you can post on some forum:
I've issued LOLwut coins (ColorID: 36738fe78a443656535503efb585fee140a37d54), each unit represents a bond with face value of 0.1 BTC payable by me, Trololo, via buy back. I promise to buy back all bonds in a month.
Now people who are interested in this LOLwut coin issue will copy ColorID, paste it into Hallucinate > Download color definition dialog, and if this color definition is published it will be downloaded and installed. Armory restart is required to complete installation.
After installation that person will be able to see these LOLwut coins.
Note that if you do not trust my registration server, you can publish color definition yourself: go to ~/.armory/colordefs, find 36738fe78a443656535503efb585fee140a37d54.colordef and upload it to your web server. Then you can give people URL like http://example.com/36738fe78a443656535503efb585fee140a37d54.colordef and they can download it by URL.
Or they can just obtain this file by any means and copy it to ~/.armory/colordefs directory. It is decentralized, nobody can prevent you from issuing colored coins.
I think that's all. There is also Hallucinate > Manage color definitions dialog, but I hope it's easy to figure out how it works.
We are working on improved version, particularly on p2p exchange feature.
I've set up an IRC channel for people to talk about trying out colored coins: #colored-coins-otc on Freenode.
submitted by killerstorm to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

is this safe cold storage?

Here is the method I plan to use for creating a cold storage, I am very new to all this, and have never used bitcoin before, I am not very technical either, anyway, here it is:
1) create a live-cd with ubuntu (on a DVD, not install anything on the hard-drive, I assume everything will be deleted once I turn off the system).
2) install Armory on ubuntu, create an encrypted wallet using the client (encryption just in case the wallet files does not delete for some reason when I turn off the os). I write down encryption key on a paper.
3) generate an address for receiving bitcoin, write down the private and public key on a paper
4) generate a paper backup for my armory wallet, write down the root-code to this on a paper using the "create paper backup" feature of armory.
5) If I ever want to send any bitcoins from my wallet and address I delete the wallet and address later. I only send bitcoins by generating a send signature using armory offline wallet that is temporary installed on a live cd. The wallet will never and have never touched the internet.
This way I should be able to always have access to receive and send my bitcoins if I still have the paper where I wrote down wallet encryption key, bitcoin addresses and wallet root code, and don't have to worry about data curruption or other hardware/software problems.
Is this a safe method? I plan to put about $10000 in bitcoins now, but just want to hear what you think about it before :) sorry for beeing a noob to this. I have read about generating codes offline using bitaddress.org as a HTML file, but I have not seen enough people checking their code to see if it is pregenerated and not as "random" as one might think.
Thanks!
submitted by snobbus to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Sure Bitcoin is safe Grandma. This is all you have to do to really secure your money

THIS IS FUCKED. BITCOIN HAS NO FUTURE IF WE CAN'T FIND A BETTER WAY TO MAKE IT SECURE. MAIN STREET WILL RUN A MILE FROM IT.
Xpost from: http://www.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/1d26gw/cold_storage_how_i_did_it/
With the recent events surrounding blockchain.info wallet attacks, I decided to bite the bullet and send all my coins to my cold wallet. It's a bit nerve wrecking but I managed. Here's what I did:
Download offline version of Armory here[1] (section Linux – Offline Bundle for Ubuntu 10.04)
Download Brainwallet source from github[2] for signing transactions, rather than the suggested way from armory website, since I don't want to run a full Bitcoin-qt client + armory to create an unsigned tx. More on this later
Prepare a USB pendrive for linux here[3] using the suggested Ubuntu 10.04 by Armory.
Boot into Linux using that pendrive. Install the Armory software and generate a new wallet. Make sure you make appropriate backup (paper copy or just write down the seed). You can always regenerate your entire wallet via brainwallet.org copy (tab Chains).
If you want, make a watch only copy of your wallet, and you can get all the public address in that wallet from your online computer via Armory offline version. Save the watch only wallet on your windows partition.
Reboot into windows/mac/your main OS.
Install armory and import the watch only wallet to see all of your addresses.
Try to move a small fund into one of the cold-storage addresses. Wait for it to have 6 confirmations. Then we can try to spend that fund by doing the following:
Get unspent output from your cold-storage address: https://blockchain.info/unspent?address=[4] Copy the output into a text file, leave it on your windows machine. Linux copy will be able to read this file.
Boot back into linux on your pendrive. Use saved brainwallet.org website to sign that transaction (use tab Transaction) by pasting the private key of the address (get from Armory, without space) and the unspent output. Sign the message. Then save the output to the same txt file.
Boot back into your main OS. Paste that signed output to http://blockchain.info/pushtx[5] and push it. You're good to go. You spent your fund in your cold storage.
Now, move everything you have from your online storage there.
submitted by BitCoinWarrior to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

How to install Bitcoin on Ubuntu 16.04 Bitcoin Armory Setup - YouTube How to Install Bitcoin Core Wallet on Ubuntu 16 How To Install BitCoin On Ubuntu 16.04

Python-based fully-featured Bitcoin Wallet Software. Alternatively you can run “sudo make install” after building and it and it will install Armory onto your Ubuntu system, including but shortcuts in your the Applications –> Internet menu. Bitcoin-Qt). The most common point of confusion is that Armory is not looking for “bitcoin-qt”, it is looking for “bitcoind” - it’s a different executable. This is the version of Bitcoin software that runs in the background with no user interface. If you are in Ubuntu using the Bitcoin PPA you have to install it separately: Configurability and security make Linux a favorite operating system for running Bitcoin Core. This guide shows how to install and run Bitcoin Core on a clean Ubuntu 18.04 system. Prerequisites. Although Ubuntu carries Bitcoin Core in the Software Center, the release tends to be out-of-date. For this reason, this tutorial won’t use the ... How To Install Bitcoin Core Wallet On Ubuntu 16.04 And Ubuntu 16.10. How to Install Bitcoin Core Wallet on Ubuntu 16.04 and Ubuntu 16.10 Bitcoin Core is a free and open source Bitcoin wallet software developed by the Bitcoin Foundation. In this tutorial we are going to look at how to install Bitcoin Core wallet on Ubuntu 16.04 and Ubuntu 16.10 . I am trying desperately to install the latest version of Armory on a fresh install of Ubuntu 17.04. I tried in Debian Jessie first, but something failed and it would not run correctly. Reinstalled my OS because everything online indicated that it would install on Ubuntu. So I downloaded 17.04 because I figured it would be the most up to date.

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How to install Bitcoin on Ubuntu 16.04

Bitcoin Core is the open source client of the bitcoin cryptocurrency. Initially, the software was published by Satoshi Nakamoto under the name Bitcoin, then Bitcoin-Qt and later renamed to Bitcoin ... Watch me setup Armory from start to finish along with downloading the blockchain from Bitcoin Core. Armory: https://www.bitcoinarmory.com/ Bitcoin Core: http... This video covers the method to install BitCoins on Ubuntu 16.04 Bitcoin is a virtual and crypto-currency created by Satoshi Nakamoto. For more explanation on this video: https://www.linuxhelp.com ... How to install Bitcoin on Ubuntu 16.04 On this video, I will show you how to install Bitcoin on Ubuntu 16.04 Commands sudo apt-add-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin sudo apt-get update “sudo apt ...

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