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Aeon

Aeon (AEON) is a private, secure, untraceable currency. You are your bank, you control your funds, and nobody can trace your transfers.
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GPU Mining Crash Course - START HERE!

Welcome All to the GPUMining Crash Course!
With the increase in prices in cryptocurrency, a lot of people are getting back into mining and a lot of people are brand new to the concept overall. So, I quickly wrote this crash course to help you understand what to expect and how to successfully mine your first cryptocurrency. This crash course isn't gonna have all of the fluff you'd see in a normal publication. This is just everything you need to know to get up and running on your first cryptocurrency mining rig.

What is cryptocurrency mining?

One of the main things about cryptocurrencies is that they are "decentralized". Sounds great, but WTF does that even mean? Well, the easiest way to explain it is...
You know how if you want to send your friend/family money digitally, you can do so through your bank. Your bank likely takes a transaction fee and in a few days they will transfer the money. Since cryptocurrencies are decentralized, they don't have a bank or organization to fulfill the transfer of money. Instead, they outsource the computing power of their cryptocurrency network to miners (soon to be you). These miners are verifying transactions, securing the blockchain, and powering the cryptocurrency's specific network among other things. As an incentive, the miners collect transaction fees on the transactions that they verify and collect block rewards while new currency is still being introduced into the ecosystem.

What kind of rig should I build?

You can mine cryptocurrencies using your CPU, GPU, FPGA, or ASIC, but this is a GPU Mining subreddit, so I will cater this to GPUs.
For building a great all-around GPU rig, there are two models of GPUs that I'd recommend:
Both of these GPUs have solid hashrates across most mining algorithms and for a decent price! You should be able to find both of these kinds of GPUs used for around $200-$250 each, which is a great price if you know what happened during the last mining craze! ($200 GPUs were out of stock everywhere and people were reselling them for $600+ each)
There are also plenty of great AMD GPUs for mining, but I've worked mostly with Nvidia so that's why both of my recommendations are Nvidia and not AMD.
Other parts to your rig that you'll need are listed below. Most of these can be pieces of crap and are just needed to make the rig actually run, but the one spot you DON'T want to cheap out on is the power supply unit. A decent power supply unit will keep your home from burning down while also keeping your rigs up and running smoothly. Here are my recommendations:

She's built, now what?

Now you need to do a few things. I am a Windows miner, so I will be speaking to Windows here:
  1. Update Windows - Do all of the updates. Just do it.
  2. Update Drivers - Go to the EVGA website and download GeForce experience. It will keep your GPU drivers up to date.
  3. Go to Windows Device Manager and make sure all of your GPUs show up under "Display Adapters". If it is there, but it isn't showing the Name/Model of the GPU as the name, right click it and select "Update Driver". This should fix it.
Assuming you've done all of this, you're ready to download a mining application.

Mining Software

There are tons to choose from! Claymore, Phoenix, EWBF, LolMiner, etc... It can be overwhelming pretty quickly since they all have different algorithm support, speeds, efficiencies, and a whole lot more. On top of that, in order to get them running you need to set up batch files to call the proper exe, point you to the correct pool, and a whole bunch of other stuff that can be confusing to a new user. Not to mention, you will probably need a separate miner, config file, batch file, etc. for each different algorithm that you're interested in mining on.
Instead, I recommend that you download a miner management software that will take care of most of this tedious work for you. There are a few in the sidebar, but the /GPUMining favorite is AIOMiner. It was developed by our very own community member, xixspiderxix with the intention of making mining as easy as possible to do and without any fees. It supports over 100 different algorithms, so you'll be able to mine nearly ANY cryptocurrency you'd like. Just download it from their website and it will take you through a quick tutorial to help you get set up! You can also connect your rig to their website for remote monitoring and control. You've probably seen a few of their posts around this subreddit.
Other Windows mining softwares include:
Note: Many mining softwares have fees built into them. Most are around 1%, but can go as high as 5% or greater! You want a mining software with little or no fees at all so that you get to keep as much cryptocurrency as possible. These fees aren't something you actively pay, the software will automatically take it by mining on the developers behalf for a given amount of time and then switching back to mining on your own behalf. So, please be diligent in the software that you evaluate and make sure it is reputable.

I keep hearing about NiceHash. What is that?

The asshole of the mining industry. Jk, but not really.
NiceHash is a software program that allows you to sell your rig's hashing power to someone on their marketplace. They market themselves as profitable mining, but you're not really mining. You're selling your power in exchange for Bitcoin.
They did a great job telling people that with them, you're always mining the most profitable coin, but that's just not true. Since it is a mining marketplace, they make you mine whatever their most expensive contract is. If their contracts are below market prices, then you're not operating as efficiently and profitably as you could be.
NiceHash also has a sketchy history, which continues to this day. In 2017, they were hacked and lost $65M worth of Bitcoin. No one got paid out for MONTHS and many of their executives conveniently resigned. Their platform is also used to destroy cryptocurrencies. Since people are able to purchase mining power on their platform, people have used their platform to purchase enough mining power to control individual cryptocurrencies and duplicate coins, which increased the malicious user's wealth while completely destroying the integrity of the coin's blockchain. HoriZEN (formerly ZenCash), Ethereum Classic, and many other great cryptocurrencies have been the victim of NiceHash's platform.
For this and many other reasons, we highly recommend that you stay AWAY from Nicehash. We understand that it is extremely easy to use and you get paid in bitcoin, but they are destroying the industry with their greed and lack of motivation to change their platform for the protection of cryptocurrencies.

Concluding Thoughts

This is pretty much everything you need to know to get started. We covered the hardware, setting up the software, which software to use, and AIOMiner's tutorial will get you up to speed on how to actually mine the cryptocurrency that you want better than I can explain it, so I'll leave that part to them.
If you have any questions on this crash course, please leave a comment below where myself and other community members will be able to help you out.
submitted by The_Brutally_Honest to gpumining [link] [comments]

Mining ERC-918 Tokens (0xBitcoin)

GENERAL INFORMATION

0xBitcoin (0xBTC) is the first mineable ERC20 token on Ethereum. It uses mining for distribution, unlike all previous ERC20 tokens which were assigned to the contract deployer upon creation. 0xBTC is the first implementation of the EIP918 mineable token standard (https://eips.ethereum.org/EIPS/eip-918), which opened up the possibility of a whole new class of mineable assets on Ethereum. Without any ICO, airdrop, pre-mine, or founder’s reward, 0xBitcoin is arguably the most decentralized asset in the Ethereum ecosystem, including even Ether (ETH), which had a large ICO.
The goal of 0xBitcoin is to be looked at as a currency and store of value asset on Ethereum. Its 21 million token hard cap and predictable issuance give it scarcity and transparency in terms of monetary policy, both things that Ether lacks. 0xBitcoin has certain advantages over PoW based currencies, such as compatibility with smart contracts and decentralized exchanges. In addition, 0xBTC cannot be 51% attacked (without attacking Ethereum), is immune from the “death spiral”, and will receive the benefits of scaling and other improvements to the Ethereum network.

GETTING 0xBITCOIN TOKENS

0xBitcoin can be mined using typical PC hardware, traded on exchanges (either decentralized or centralized) or purchased from specific sites/contracts.

-Mined using PC hardware

-Traded on exchanges such as


MINING IN A NUTSHELL

0xBitcoin is a Smart Contract on the Ethereum network, and the concept of Token Mining is patterned after Bitcoin's distribution. Rather than solving 'blocks', work is issued by the contract, which also maintains a Difficulty which goes up or down depending on how often a Reward is issued. Miners can put their hardware to work to claim these rewards, in concert with specialized software, working either by themselves or together as a Pool. The total lifetime supply of 0xBitcoin is 21,000,000 tokens and rewards will repeatedly halve over time.
The 0xBitcoin contract was deployed by Infernal_Toast at Ethereum address: 0xb6ed7644c69416d67b522e20bc294a9a9b405b31
0xBitcoin's smart contract, running on the Ethereum network, maintains a changing "Challenge" (that is generated from the previous Ethereum block hash) and an adjusting Difficulty Target. Like traditional mining, the miners use the SoliditySHA3 algorithm to solve for a Nonce value that, when hashed alongside the current Challenge and their Minting Ethereum Address, is less-than-or-equal-to the current Difficulty Target. Once a miner finds a solution that satisfies the requirements, they can submit it into the contract (calling the Mint() function). This is most often done through a mining pool. The Ethereum address that submits a valid solution first is sent the 50 0xBTC Reward.
(In the case of Pools, valid solutions that do not satisfy the full difficulty specified by the 0xBitcoin contract, but that DO satisfy the Pool's specified Minimum Share Difficulty, get a 'share'. When one of the Miners on that Pool finds a "Full" solution, the number of shares each miner's address has submitted is used to calculate how much of the 50 0xBTC reward they will get. After a Reward is issued, the Challenge changes.
A Retarget happens every 1024 rewards. In short, the Contract tries to target an Average Reward Time of about 60 times the Ethereum block time. So (at the time of this writing):
~13.9 seconds \* 60 = 13.9 minutes
If the average Reward Time is longer than that, the difficulty will decrease. If it's shorter, it will increase. How much longer or shorter it was affects the magnitude with which the difficulty will rise/drop, to a maximum of 50%. * Click Here to visit the stats page~ (https://0x1d00ffff.github.io/0xBTC-Stats) to see recent stats and block times, feel free to ask questions about it if you need help understanding it.

MINING HARDWARE

Presently, 0xBitcoin and "Alt Tokens" can be mined on GPUs, CPUs, IGPs (on-CPU graphics) and certain FPGAs. The most recommended hardware is nVidia graphics cards for their efficiency, ubiquity and relatively low cost. As general rules, the more cores and the higher core frequency (clock) you can get, the more Tokens you will earn!
Mining on nVidia cards:
Mining on AMD cards:
Mining on IGPs (e.g. AMD Radeon and Intel HD Graphics):
Clocks and Power Levels:

MINING SOFTWARE AND DESCRIPTIONS

For the most up-to-date version info, download links, thread links and author contact information, please see this thread: https://www.reddit.com/0xbitcoin/comments/8o06dk/links_to_the_newestbest_miners_for_nvidia_amd/ Keep up to date for the latest speed, stability and feature enhancements!
COSMiC Miner by LtTofu:
SoliditySha3Miner by Amano7:
AIOMiner All-In-One GPU Miner:
TokenMiner by MVis (Mining-Visualizer):
"Nabiki"/2.10.4 by Azlehria:
~Older Miners: Older and possibly-unsupported miner versions can be found at the above link for historical purposes and specific applications- including the original NodeJS CPU miner by Infernal Toast/Zegordo, the '1000x' NodeJS/C++ hybrid version of 0xBitcoin-Miner and Mikers' enhanced CUDA builds.

FOR MORE INFORMATION...

If you have any trouble, the friendly and helpful 0xBitcoin community will be happy to help you out. Discord has kind of become 0xBTC's community hub, you can get answers the fastest from devs and helpful community members. Or message one of the community members on reddit listed below.
Links
submitted by GeoffedUP to gpumining [link] [comments]

Best $100-$300 FPGA development board in 2018?

Hello, I’ve been trying to decide on a FPGA development board, and have only been able to find posts and Reddit threads from 4-5 years ago. So I wanted to start a new thread and ask about the best “mid-range” FGPA development board in 2018. (Price range $100-$300.)
I started with this Quora answer about FPGA boards, from 2013. The Altera DE1 sounded good. Then I looked through the Terasic DE boards.
Then I found this Reddit thread from 2014, asking about the DE1-SoC vs the Cyclone V GX Starter Kit: https://www.reddit.com/FPGA/comments/1xsk6w/cyclone_v_gx_starter_kit_vs_de1soc_board/‬ (I was also leaning towards the DE1-SoC.)
Anyway, I thought I better ask here, because there are probably some new things to be aware of in 2018.
I’m completely new to FPGAs and VHDL, but I have experience with electronics/microcontrollers/programming. My goal is to start with some basic soft-core processors. I want to get some C / Rust programs compiling and running on my own CPU designs. I also want to play around with different instruction sets, and maybe start experimenting with asynchronous circuits (e.g. clock-less CPUs)
Also I don’t know if this is possible, but I’d like to experiment with ternary computing, or work with analog signals instead of purely digital logic. EDIT: I just realized that you would call those FPAAs, i.e. “analog” instead of “gate”. Would be cool if there was a dev board that also had an FPAA, but no problem if not.
EDIT 2: I also realized why "analog signals on an FPGA" doesn't make any sense, because of how LUTs work. They emulate boolean logic with a lookup table, and the table can only store 0s and 1s. So there's no way to emulate a transistor in an intermediate state. I'll just have play around with some transistors on a breadboard.
UPDATE: I've put together a table with some of the best options:
Board Maker Chip LUTs Price SoC? Features
icoBoard Lattice iCE40-HX8K 7,680 $100 Sort of A very simple FPGA development board that plugs into a Raspberry Pi, so you have a "backup" hard-core CPU that can control networking, etc. Supports a huge range of pmod accessories. You can write a program/circuit so that the Raspberry Pi CPU and the FPGA work together, similar to a SoC. Proprietary bitstream is fully reverse engineered and supported by Project IceStorm, and there is an open-source toolchain that can compile your hardware design to bitstream. Has everything you need to start experimenting with FPGAs.
iCE40-HX8K Breakout Board Lattice iCE40-HX8K-CT256 7,680 $49 No 8 LEDs, 8 switches. Very similar to icoBoard, but no Raspberry Pi or pmod accessories.
iCE40 UltraPlus Lattice iCE40 UltraPlus FPGA 5280 $99 No Chip specs. 4 switchable FPGAs, and a rechargeable battery. Bluetooth module, LCD Display (240 x 240 RGB), RGB LED, microphones, audio output, compass, pressure, gyro, accelerometer.
Go Board Lattice ICE40 HX1K FPGA 1280 $65 No 4 LEDs, 4 buttons, Dual 7-Segment LED Display, VGA, 25 MHz on-board clock, 1 Mb Flash.
snickerdoodle Xilinx Zynq 7010 28K $95 Yes Xilinx Zynq 7-Series SoC - ARM Cortex-A9 processor, and Artix-7 FPGA. 125 IO pins. 1GB DDR2 RAM. Texas Instruments WiLink 8 wireless module for 802.11n Wi-Fi and Bluetooth 4.1. No LEDs or buttons, but easy to wire up your own on a breadboard. If you want to use a baseboard, you'll need a snickerdoodle black ($195) with the pins in the "down" orientation. (E.g. The "breakyBreaky breakout board" ($49) or piSmasher SBC ($195)). The snickerdoodle one only comes with pins in the "up" orientation and doesn't support any baseboards. But you can still plug the jumpers into the pins and wire up things on a breadboard.
numato Mimas A7 Xilinx Artix 7 52K $149 No 2Gb DDR3 RAM. Gigabit Ethernet. HDMI IN/OUT. 100MHz LVDS oscillator. 80 IOs. 7-segment display, LEDs, buttons. (Found in this Reddit thread.)
Ultra96 Xilinx Zynq UltraScale+ ZU3EG 154K $249 Yes Has one of the latest Xilinx SoCs. 2 GB (512M x32) LPDDR4 Memory. Wi-Fi / Bluetooth. Mini DisplayPort. 1x USB 3.0 type Micro-B, 2x USB 3.0 Type A. Audio I/O. Four user-controllable LEDs. No buttons and limited LEDs, but easy to wire up your own on a breadboard
Nexys A7-100T Xilinx Artix 7 15,850 $265 No . 128MiB DDR2 RAM. Ethernet port, PWM audio output, accelerometer, PDM microphone, microphone, etc. 16 switches, 16 LEDs. 7 segment displays. USB HID Host for mice, keyboards and memory sticks.
Zybo Z7-10 Xilinx Zynq 7010 17,600 $199 Yes Xilinx Zynq 7000 SoC (ARM Cortex-A9, 7-series FPGA.) 1 GB DDR3 RAM. A few switches, push buttons, and LEDs. USB and Ethernet. Audio in/out ports. HDMI source + sink with CEC. 8 Total Processor I/O, 40 Total FPGA I/O. Also a faster version for $299 (Zybo Z7-20).
Arty A7 Xilinx Artix 7 15K $119 No 256MB DDR3L. 10/100 Mbps Ethernet. A few switches, buttons, LEDs.
DE10-Standard (specs) Altera Cyclone V 110K $350 Yes Dual-core Cortex-A9 processor. Lots of buttons, LEDs, and other peripherals.
DE10-Nano Altera Cyclone V 110K $130 Yes Same as DE10-Standard, but not as many peripherals, buttons, LEDs, etc.

Winner:

icoBoard ($100). (Buy it here.)
The icoBoard plugs into a Raspberry Pi, so it's similar to having a SoC. The iCE40-HX8K chip comes with 7,680 LUTs (logic elements.) This means that after you learn the basics and create some simple circuits, you'll also have enough logic elements to run the VexRiscv soft-core CPU (the lightweight Murax SoC.)
The icoBoard also supports a huge range of pluggable pmod accessories:
You can pick whatever peripherals you're interested in, and buy some more in the future.
Every FPGA vendor keeps their bitstream format secret. (Here's a Hacker News discussion about it.) The iCE40-HX8K bitstream has been fully reverse engineered by Project IceStorm, and there is an open-source set of tools that can compile Verilog to iCE40 bitstream.
This means that you have the freedom to do some crazy experiments, like:
You don't really have the same freedom to explore these things with Xilinx or Altera FPGAs. (Especially asynchronous circuits.)

Links:

Second Place:

iCE40-HX8K Breakout Board ($49)

Third Place:

numato Mimas A7 ($149).
An excellent development board with a Xilinx Artix 7 FPGA, so you can play with a bigger / faster FPGA and run a full RISC-V soft-core with all the options enabled, and a much higher clock speed. (The iCE40 FPGAs are a bit slow and small.)
Note: I've changed my mind several times as I learned new things. Here's some of my previous thoughts.

What did I buy?

I ordered a iCE40-HX8K Breakout Board to try out the IceStorm open source tooling. (I would have ordered an icoBoard if I had found it earlier.) I also bought a numato Mimas A7 so that I could experiment with the Artix 7 FPGA and Xilinx software (Vivado Design Suite.)

Questions

What can I do with an FPGA? / How many LUTs do I need?

submitted by ndbroadbent to FPGA [link] [comments]

About reducing the BCH block time, I have something to say...

I want to introduce myself by first (to avoid to be considered to be troll).
My name is Danny, Chinese, my first contact with Bitcoin was in 2013. My background is integrated circuit design. I studied C/C++ and linux in the college 15 years ago. I am not very familiar with open source software design, but my technology background is good enough to let me learn things quickly. I have developed a FPGA based SHA-256 miner and succesfully connect to the Eligius pool in early 2014 (Just for fun), all by C and verilog. I am a developer but not a professional software developer.
I am familiar with Bitcoin, transaction and block structure. I developed a program which can upload and download arbitrary file from/to the Bitcoincash blockchain. The downloader code is open sourced: https://github.com/bchfile/BCHFILE-extractor
I think I am not a troll.
Although many users and devs think Blocktime is not an issue, but a simple fact is that there is no single mainstream crypto choose a blocktime equal or larger than 10 minutes (No offense to anyone, I just express the idea that this is an undeniable proof that a shortter confirmation time has real needs).
For wallet users: If someone send me some BCH, although 0-conf gives some confidence, but I still need to wait for at least 1 confirmation to "make sure" someone else is not cheeting me (not 100%, but 1 confirm really means something), each more confirmation makes more confidence.
For nodes: You cannot spend a unconfirmed UTXO by default, you need to list the unspent UTXO and use createrawtransaction, signrawtransaction to manually create the TX and broadcast it. That means you need to wait for the TX to be confirmed before spend it by default.
Variance: (Here, I want to say sorry to many people especially some devs, in the previous posts, I did not show enough respect to them. In fact, the developers have done a lot of excellent work, most of which are unpaid, but not well known to the public.) The Variance is already been discussed by devs a long time, bobtail algorithm is a potential alternative, I have not figure it out by now, but reduce the block time can achieve a similar result, it's simple, 10 1-min block have an averagy effect, it has much less variance than 1 10-min block.
For exchanges: Obviously the exchanges plays the most important role in the crypto eco-system. Exchanges usually run "official" bitcoin cash nodes (bitcoin-abc), change the block time does not affect them (because the RPC call is not changed), the only affection is that they need to increase the confirmation numbers for deposit.
For developers: They need to upgrade the software before the HF just as the previous ones. Although change the blocktime is a major change, but in Code, the changes are rare, only a few lines of codes are affected for the core functions. (To approve this, I created a Bitcoin-abc fork in github, modified the blocktime to 2-min and reduce the subsidy to 1/5 at the same time, all the changes canbe seen here: https://github.com/Danyu-Wu/bitcoin-abc/commit/884414a04884a462c8e424ab1bde2fe632f59591). I spend 1 week to study the source code, and spend 2 days to complete the modification (Changes for test-code and some non-core functions are not completed yet), and 3 days for run the test (includes run a pool and connect to the testnet, in here you can find the blocks I mined in the testnet: https://www.blocktrail.com/tBCC/address/mmBG7ReKgGQgqhSZQjR28NvVDfeekjpnpV). I am not a professional programmer but can finish the core changes within 2-weeks, so it is clear that the change does not need much work.
----------------------------------------------------
In summary, I think change the blocktime maybe not the perfect consensus change for BCH, but that is the simplest one to improve the user experience significantly.
BTW: Anyone, especially developers who are interested in this topic, you can find the telegram group link here: https://github.com/Danyu-Wu/blocktime/blob/masteworkgroup.md
submitted by wudanyu to btc [link] [comments]

Bitcoin is the fake Skycoin

Satoshi Nakamoto said that biggest flaw in Bitcoin network are miners. That's because consensus algorithm, TX hash rate is dependent on miners calculation. Basically, we are consuming a lot of electricity to gather multiple tx in a block, in order to 3 Chinese mining pools can smash that block and take the Bitcoin reward. And if is not enough, the mining pools can inject fake tx in the network to clog it, so TX fees for us (peasants) will go higher.
  1. Why we are using hardware and electricity to create one block?
  2. Why Consensus algorithm is dependent on a new block creation?
  3. Where is the new Internet we all wanted back in 2009-2010 where millions of computer would be the network ?
https://medium.com/@Skycoinproject/cyberbalkanization-and-the-future-of-the-internets-f03f2b590c39
A) Skycoin is the bigger brother of Bitcoin. Early developers of Bitcoin knew that Miners will control the Bitcoin network in the future, so a part of them started to research a new Consensus Algorithm called Obeliskhttps://www.skycoin.net/blog/posts/obelisk-the-skycoin-consensus-algorithm/
B) Skycoin resolved 51% attack, sybil attack, has 0 TX fee, 1-2 sec for a tx , and is private. But the most important thing.
Skycoin is the only crypto out there who fixed the problem of volatility of a cryptocurrency. What's that ? Imagine if price of Skycoin goes higher and higher, peasants will ''HoDL'' it, so the term ''currency '' is lost. Why someone would spend an asset that goes higher and higher?
B1) One Skycoin kept in the wallet is creating non-stop a second currency called CoinHour. 1SKY is creating 24 CoinHours per day and so on. Coinhour is backed by bandwidth => Skywire(Software Defined Network) is the New Internet that gives Skycoin a real value, a commodity level value. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-CbSdVIwr8E
B2) In this ecosystem Skycoin behaves like an equity and CoinHour is the real currency. For example Skycoin Price can reach 1 million and the price of Coinhour is independent, its equilibrium is reached by supply and demand of the market https://explorer.skycoin.net/app/blocks/1
C) Ethereum has a buggy prog language and all shitcoins are on Ethereum Blockchain (Database) with only 30 tx/s. Why would someone would gather all the data on ONE Database?!
C1) Skycoin created CX ( first deterministic cryptographic prog language) https://www.skycoin.net/blog/posts/cx-overview/
C2) Skycoin created Fiber https://www.skycoin.net/fibe ( basically you can create your own blockchain with 300-3000 tx/s, private or public , with hardware customization ( law firms, government entities and so on as early adopters)
D) Skywire is the New Internet built at the Hardware and Software level
-Skywire is hardware agnostic
-Skywire has its DYI Antennas
- Skywire has FPGA boards
-Skyiwire has 10k nodes online ( more than TOR)
Bibliography:
  1. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMAS-n0SGseIZPxWuaQVFkg
  2. https://www.skycoin.net/downloads/
  3. https://www.skycoin.net/blog/

TLDR: one neighbor is rendering a movie. He wants 1 TB/ s. He will pay CoinHour to his neighbors to borrow bandwidth capacity of their sky clusters and antennas.
Skycoin Address : 25139AGYjwGwgKMZEA268GbJyXrZGWF533i
submitted by CaptainCuc to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

What is SUQA project – How to mine SUQA coin

What is SUQA project – How to mine SUQA coin
SUQA coin is fast (533 Transactions per second) and almost No Transaction Fees. This makes it unique comparing with other projects.
SUQA is a new digital currency that has a new X22i POW algo. X22i algo is not a copy or clone of any old one but it is completely ASIC, FPGA and Quantum Resistant.
SUQA project also have a newest feature that u can 5% apr interest from term deposits even if the wallet is offline.
SUQA project aims to create the hub with SUQA payments and without taking any fees.
SUQA has a unique time-lock interest system for every user to earn deposits from their wallets without technical knowledge.
Since SUQA project is a new, unique ASIC, FPGA, Quantum resistant algorithm is very helpful for the mining community and solves numerous problems for miners. For example if you have a one GPU or only one rig you will be able to mine to the last block of SUQA without comparing any ASIC or FPGA device because SUQA will renew the algo every 6 months.
In real life SUQA will support the its community by foundation activities like mining, donations, bounty campaigns. ect.SUQA coin can be mined by GPUs (Nvidia and AMD) and CPUs. But it is only possible to mine it profitable by GPUs. SUQA unique X22i algo is also energy efficient and make your GPUs to less heat.
How To Mine SUQA coin
To mine SUQA coin 1) you need to find a miner software based on the GPU you have. 2) Download wallet and get a SUQA wallet address. 3) And then select a good pool.
Suqa Coin Algo: X22i
MINER:
– AMD:zjazz_amd_minerhttps://github.com/zjazz/zjazz_amd_minereleases
– NVIDIA:ccminer x22i win64 binary releasehttps://github.com/SUQAORG/ccminer-x22i/releases
zjazz_cuda_minerhttps://github.com/zjazz/zjazz_cuda_minereleases/tag/1.0
Trexhttps://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=4432704.0
Example for trex miner .bat code:t-rex.exe -a x22i -o stratum+tcp://suqa-pool.beepool.org:9504 -u YourSUQAWallet.WorkerName -p c=SUQA -R 3

https://preview.redd.it/3k92xaieh8221.jpg?width=757&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=5b5d8259fd9847a9c003187ed7f8fa5ae14e5de2

SUQA coin hashrate, SUQA coin mining performance

Nvidia GTX 1070 – 6.4MH/s (Gigabyte GTX 1070 OC )– Nvidia GTX 1070 Ti – 7.5 Mh/s (Gigabyte GTX 1070Ti OC )– Nvidia GTX 1080Ti – 11.5 Mh/s (MSI GTX 1080Ti)
– AMD RX580 – 3.2 Mh/s (Sapphire RX 580)

SUQA coin Mining Profitability

Mining SUQA coin you will get this: SUQA price is now ~ $0,005546 (138 satoshi)
– 120 SUQA / GTX 1080Ti daily– 75 SUQA / GTX 1070 Ti daily– 65 SUQA / 7x GTX 1070 daily
SUQA coin Mining Pools: https://bsod.pw https://icemining.ca https://beepool.org/coindetail/suqaand for more pools https://discord.gg/ArttaNA
SUQA coin Difficulty: 8824.28235 @ block 22 179
SUQA coin block reward: 5000
SUQA coin Exchange Markets:Suqa coin is now on
Official Exchanges – Check on CoinMarketCap
  1. Escodexhttps://wallet.escodex.com/market/ESCODEX.SUQACOIN_ESCODEX.BTC
  2. Stexhttps://app.stex.com/en/basic-trade/paiBTC/SUQA/1D
  3. QBTChttps://www.myqbtc.com/trade
And Crypto-Bridge is on the wayhttps://wallet.crypto-bridge.org/market/BRIDGE.SUQA_BRIDGE.BTC
Website: https://suqa.org
Whitepaper: https://suqa.org/file/2018/10/suqa-whitepaper.pdf
BitcoinTalk: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5038269.0
GitHub: https://github.com/SUQAORG
Twitter: https://twitter.com/SUQAfoundation
Facebook: https://facebook.com/SUQAFoundation
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Author: uk baxoi
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submitted by mahdi32 to gpumining [link] [comments]

Check out Part 1 of our first Skycoin Official AMA with Synth!

Part 2 of the AMA posted here.
 
What is Skywire? Where does it fit in with Skycoin?
Skycoin is a blockchain application platform. We have multiple coins in the platform (Metallicoin, mdl.life, solarbankers.com, etc). We let people launch their own blockchain applications (including coins).
There are two parts to Skywire. The first part is the Skywire node. The second part is the hardware.
Skywire is one of the first applications we are launching on the Skycoin platform. It is one of our flagship applications that has been in development for several years. Skywire is basically a decentralized ISP on blockchain. It is like Tor, but you are paid to run it. You forward packets for your neighbors and you receive coins You pay coins to other people for forwarding your packets.
So it is like Tor but on blockchain and you are paid for running the network. Also, while Tor is slow, Skywire was designed to be faster than the current internet, instead of slower.
Skywire is a test application for monetizing excess bandwidth. Eventually the software defined networking technology behind Skywire, will allow us to build physical networks (actual mesh nets) that can begin to replace centralized ISPs. However, the current Skywire prototype is still running over the existing internet, but later we will start building out our own hardware.
Skywire is a solution for protecting people’s privacy and is also a solution to net neutrality. If Skycoin can can decentralize the ISPs with blockchain, then we wont have to beg the FCC to protect our rights.
Skywire is just a prototype of a larger system. Eventually we will allow people to sell bandwidth, computational resources and storage.
On the hardware side, the Skywire Miner is a like a personal cloud, for blockchain applications. It has eight computers in it and you plug it in and you can run your blockchain applications on it. You can even earn coins by renting out capacities to other users on the network.
 
How would your everyday, average Joe user access the Skywire network? Let's say from their phone…
We designed Skywire and Skycoin to be as usable as possible. We think you should not have to be a software developer to use blockchain applications.
Skywire is designed to be “zeroconf”, with zero configuration. You just plug in your node and it works. Its plug and play.
Eventually you will be able to buy a Skywire Miner and delegate control of the hardware to a “pool”, who will configure it for you and do all the work, optimize the settings and the pool will just take a small fee for the service and owner of the hardware will receive the rest of the coins their miners are earning.
You will just plug in the Skyminer and start earning coins. It will be plug and play.
Most users will not know their traffic is being carried over Skywire. Just like they do not know if they are using TCP or UDP. They will just connect their computer to the network with wifi or an ethernet cable and it will work exactly like the internet does now.
 
Are you completely anonymous on Skywire, or do you need to add a VPN and go through Tor for extra protection?
Skywire is designed, to protect users privacy much better than the existing internet. Each node only knows the previous hop and the next hop for any packet. The contents of the packet are encrypted (like HTTPS), so no one can spy on the data.
Since Skywire is designed to be faster than the existing internet, you give up a little privacy for the speed. Tor makes packets harder to trace by reshuffling them and slowing them done. While Skywire is designed for pure speed and performance.
 
Will Skywire users be able to access traditional internet resources like Google and Facebook over Skywire?
Yes. Most users will not even know they are using Skywire at all. It will be completely invisible to them.
Skywire has two modes of operation. One mode looks like the normal internet to the user and the other mode is for special applications designed to run completely inside of the Skywire network. Skywire native apps will have increased privacy, speed and performance, but all existing internet apps will still work on the new network.
 
How difficult will it be for a traditional e-service to port their products and services to Skywire / Skycoin? Are there plans in place to facilitate those transitions as companies find the exceeding value in joining the free distributed internet?
We are going to make it very easy. Existing companies run their whole internal networks on MPLS and Skywire is almost identical to MPLS, so they wont have to make any changes in most cases.
 
What is the routing protocol? How are the routes found?
Skywire is source routed. This means that you choose the route your data takes. You can chose routes that offer higher privacy, more bandwidth (for video downloads) or lower latency (for gaming).
Skywire puts control of the data back to the user.
 
I have also understand that the protocols underlying in skywire will be/already are pretty different from the Internet protocols. Taking into account the years of research applied to the current Internet and the several strategies for routing it doesn't seem an easy task to rebuild everything and make it work. Where can be found the information about the routing strategies used in skywire?
The routing strategies are user defined. There is no best routing strategy that is optimal for every user or application. Instead we allow people to choose their routes and policies, based upon the application, time of day, available bandwidth, reliability and other factors.
This is actually the way the original internet worked. However, it was scrapped because of the RAM limitations of early computers which only had 4 KB of memory. So the internet was built upon stateless routing protocols because of the limitations of the available computers at the time, not because the networking protocols were the best or highest performance. Today even a cell phone has 4 GB of ram and 1 million times the memory of a computer in the 1980s, so there is no reason to accept these limitations anymore.
Our implementation is simpler and faster because we are stripping away the layers of junk that have accumulated. The internet was actually built up piecemeal, without any coherence, coordination or planning. The internet today is a mishmash of different ad-hoc protocols that have been duct taped together over decades, without any real design.
Skywire is an re-envisioning of the internet, if it was built today knowing what we know now. This means simplifying the protocols and improving the performance.
 
How will the routing work if someone from Europe wants to access a video from a node in Australia (for example)? How do the nodes know the next hop if they cant read the origin or destiny of any packet?
If you have a route with N hops, then you contact each of the nodes on the route (through a messaging service) and set the route table on each route. Then when you drop a packet in the route, it gets forwarded automatically. You could have 60 or 120 hops between Australia and Europe and its fine.
Each individual node only knows the previous hop and the next hop in the chain. That is all the node needs to know.
 
Could you estimate a timeline for when Skywire will operate independently from the current ISP infrastructure?
I think Skycoin is a very ambitious project and some parts could take ten or twenty years. Even if we started with a network of a few thousand nodes and we were growing the network over 1% per day, it will still take a decade or two to conquer the Earth.
We are going to start with small scale prototypes (neighborhoods), then try cities. I think the first demonstration networks will be working this year.
 
How will bandwidth be priced in terms of coin hours and who determines this rate?
You could have 40 PHDs each do a thesis on this. The short answer is that an auction model has to be used (similar to Google’s Ad Words auction model) and the auction has to be designed in a way so that the bandwidth prices reach a stable equilibrium.
There are parts of Skycoin that are completely open source and public, like the blockchain and consensus algorithm and Skywire. There are secrets like the auction model and pricing, that are designed to protect Skycoin from being forked and to prevent competitors from copying our work.
We estimate that if a competitor was to start today, with 2 million dollars a year in R&D, that it would take them a minimum of eight years to develop a working bandwidth pricing model. And from experience in auction models for advertising networks, 80% of the competitors will fail to develop a working model at all.
A working, fair, decentralized bandwidth pricing model that was competitive with what we have would take even longer. There are very few people (less than 4) on Earth who have the experience in mathematics, economics, game theory and cryptographic protocols to design the required auction and pricing models.
One of Google’s secrets that allows them to dominate the internet advertising industry, is their auction model for ad pricing. That is what allows Google to pay the content producers the most money for their advertising inventory, while charging the advertising buyers the least.
Google’s auction models for pricing AdSense inventory are even more secretive and important than Google’s search algorithm. This is one of the most important and secretive parts of Google’s business. Even companies like Facebook, with billion dollar war chests have been unable to replicate to close the algorithm gap in this area. Expertise in these algorithms and their auction and pricing models is one of the reasons that Google has been able to extract advertising premiums over Facebook.
Even if a competitor raises a billion dollars and hires all the PHDs in the field and they had ten years to do research, I doubt they would be able to develop anything close to what we have now.
The history of bandwidth markets is very interesting and Enron tried to do a trading desk for bandwidth and bandwidth futures and it completely failed. The mathematical stability and predictability of the pricing of bandwidth under adversarial conditions is one of the major problems.
For instance, one of our “competitors” suggests that people will be paid coins if someone accesses their content. So why don’t you just put a website and then have 2000 bots go to it, to get free coins! How are they going to stop that.
Or if they are pricing bandwidth, if the price is fixed and the price is too low, then people will not build capacity and bandwidth will be insufficient and the network will be slow.
Or if the price is variable and adjusts with demands, what will stop someone from buying up the capacity for a link (“Cornering the Market”) to drive the price up 50x on links they control and extort money out of the other people on the network with a fake bandwidth shortage?
The pricing algorithm has to be stable under adversarial conditions. It is a very difficult problem, harder than even consensus algorithm research. Even if a competitor had unlimited funding and unlimited time, it is unlikely that they would find a superior solution to what we have and that alone nearly guarantees that we are going to win this market. It gets even more difficult if you need price stability and you admit any type of bandwidth futures, that allow speculation on future prices. This is a kind of problem like Bitcoin consensus algorithm that can only be solved by an act of genius.
We have a lot of experience in this area. It is hyper specialized and a very difficult area and is one of the areas that will give Skycoin a strong sustainable advantage.
 
Will there be a DNS for Skywire to register .sky domains?
Of course. We will definitely add some kind of DNS and name system eventually.
Remembering and typing public keys is too difficult. We want to make it as easy as possible. We want people to be able to register aliases (like screen names) so that people can send coins to aliases instead of having to type in addresses every time.
This will let people send 5 Skycoin to “@bobcat” instead of sending coins to “23TeSPPJVZ9HvXh6iYiKAaLNQroKg8yCdja”. This will be a revolution in usability.
 
When operating a Skyminer, will people in my surrounding area see it as a Wifi option on their devices?
You can configure it to expose a wifi access point. It depends on what you are trying to do.
 
While I plan on running a DIY miner regardless of the payout, will one of the first 6000 DIY miners built to the same spec as the official miner receive a worthwhile payout in Sky coin? What is the requirement for a DIY miner to get whitelisted (and earning Skycoin) on the Skywire testnet?
The reason we have white-listing on the testnet, is to stop too many nodes from joining the network at once. The network can only support so many nodes until we upgrade certain infrastructure (like the messaging/inter-process communication standard).
Eventually, all DIY miners will be whitelisted, but there will probably be a queue.
 
The Sky team is developing antennas by their own instead of buying or using technology already developed, why is such an effort necessary?
You can of course, buy any commercial antenna or wifi system and use it for Skywire.
We are developing our own custom antennas, to push performance limitations and experiment with advanced technology, like FPGAs (Field Programmable Arrays) and SDR (Software Defined Radio).
Existing wifi has a huge latency (15 milliseconds per hop). We need to make several modification to get that down to 0.5 millisecond per hop.
We have several custom PCB boards in development. We have a few secret hardware projects that will be announced when they are ready.
For instance, the Skywire Miner was in development for two years before we publicly announced it. Some of our next hardware projects are focused on payments at the point of sale and improving usability, not just the meshnet.
 
So back in January Steve was asked a question in the skywire group: "Steve, I am not a tech savage, so how can I understand better the safety running a miner if people on the network do DeepWeb stuff? So i will receive and redirect data packets with crazy things and also there is around 128 GB of storage on my miner. How can i have peace of mind of that?" He replied with "If you don’t run an exit node to the open internet it won’t matter you can run relay nodes if you’re worried about it, or proxy specific content." This seems to goes counter to what you mentioned regarding end-to-end encryption with Skywire. Will some people only be relay nodes and some will be exit nodes as well?
I think the question is wrong.
You only store content for public keys that you explicitly subscribe to.
This means if you do not like particular content or do not want it on your hardware, then you can just blacklist those public keys or don’t subscribe to them. Data never goes on your machine unless you requested it.
If you are holding data for a third party such as forwarding packets, it’s always going to be encrypted, so will look like random noise. There will never be anything in the data that causes legal liability. It will look the same as the output of a random number generator.
 
If using the skyminer, how much bandwidth will be necessary to run it at its best? And what about the router? It's true it has only 100mbits output? Is a 1gigbits connection necessary to reach toprates?
Hold on!!!! Let us get the software and test net running first, lol. We will know once we know what works for the testnet.
 
What will the price be for future Skynodes (formerly called Skyminers)?
We are working on ways of reducing the cost, such as by buying our own factory, doing custom PCB boards and using different materials.
The cheapest Skywire Miner node will be about $30 for a single node miner. We will have a very cheap personal Skywire “hardware VPN” node also.
The miners we are shipping now are for powering the network backbone and have 8 computers and are about $800 each. We sold people the miners for 1 BTC each so they can support development, but gave them a Skycoin bonus equal to about 1 BTC worth of Skycoin.
Then that money, went to fund the cost for developing the newer hardware.
submitted by MuSKYteer to skycoin [link] [comments]

Why is getting into FPGA's such a crappy experience?

I'm a hobbyist and this is my first venture into FPGA's. I understand how FPGA works in theory. It's just a bunch of combinational logic connected by clock-connected flip-flops, whose topology and combinational functions can be programmed with a high level language. I bought a Xilinx board from embeddedmicro.com and I'm going to work through their tutorials.
All I want to be able to do is specify a bunch of like registers and crap, and how to connect them with clocked flip-flops to do some really basic stuff like a simple CPU with 1-2 custom instructions or something. So why do I have to download a GIANT SIX GIGABYTE FILE TO DO THAT? What could this software possibly be doing that it needs to be that big?
In a sane world, all I'd need is a board and a simple compiler which just takes the high-level language and turns it into the topology file to upload to the board. But in the insanity in which I am currently living, I have to download some gigantic IDE that is going to be huge and probably slower than mining bitcoins on an NES. I don't know because IT'S STILL DOWNLOADING.
So to even get to the download, I had to log into the website, register, and give them a name and a physical address (and God forbid I should leave the "Company" field empty!). The Licensing crap on their website looks like you need an MBA to understand it. This company sells pieces of hardware, FFS! Why in Stallman's name can't they just make the software FOSS and let anyone download it instead of all this BS about WEBPACK this and annual upgrade that?
Xilinx, in case you haven't noticed, in order for anyone to actually use your software, THEY HAVE TO BUY A CHIP OR BOARD AND YOU CAN MAKE MONEY OFF YOUR CUSTOMERS THAT WAY. CHARGING FOR SOFTWARE OR HAVING A BYZANTINE PROCESS FOR GETTING A FREE LICENSE MAKES ZERO SENSE FOR A HARDWARE COMPANY.
Anyone know a place where you can just buy an FPGA board, plug it into a USB port, sudo apt-get install some FOSS compiler, type your Verilog or VHDL or whatever into emacs, run 2-5 commands and have a running design?
If such a place doesn't exist, some startup needs to disrupt this industry. If you make it easy for people to develop for your HW, those devs will be inclined buy your product just to make their lives easier.
submitted by white_nerdy to FPGA [link] [comments]

High memory FPGAs? Other newbie questions.

Background: My degree is in computer science. I've worked various jobs in IT related fields. I have programmed in a smattering of languages (C/Java/etc) and mostly worked at an application layer and up. In school I did take several computer hardware classes, and in one we built our own 16-bit MIPS CPU (with pipelining) in a circuit simulator that one of the professors had written himself in Java. We created our own DRAM cells, NAND/AND/XOetc gates, we created our own shifters and multiplexers, stuff like that. But again...in a Java GUI, not anything practical like verilog.
End goal: I like performance. I like to tinker and make things go faster. I missed the bitcoin (and altcoin) FPGA rush by about 2-3 years. Currently, GPU mining is dominated by so-called 'ASIC resistant' algorithms which mostly resist ASICs by requiring a large amount of RAM (800MB-2GB, depending on algo) as part of the algorithm.
Partly as a novelty for my personal use, and partly so that I have at least some level of knowledge of yet another IT field I can go into should I ever get laid off or sick of my current job, I want to learn how to program an FPGA for the purposes of implementing at least one of these ASIC-resistant algorithms. The energy savings over a GPU would be nice as well, as from what I can see most FPGAs are at least an order of magnitude, if not two, more efficient than a GPU.
So, on to my questions:
  1. Xilinx seems to be the number one 'newbie' FPGA maker (I say this because I see them mentioned more frequently than any other maker in threads foby newbies). Apparently I can download their software kit and use their simulator to design and test in software; I don't need the actual FPGA circuit/card until I am ready to put my design 'into production'. Am I correct in thinking this? Are there other manufacturers I should target instead?
  2. Given my school experience designing circuits at something like a UML or CAD level, are there any recommended paths I should look into, or is learning VHDL/Verilog a pretty hard requirement to implementing any design? I'm asking because I'm ignorant.
  3. Maybe best asked for later, but would the Xilinx simulator give me some idea of which FPGA I'd want to buy? Will it give me anything approaching an 'expected behavior' ('hey, it runs at 1h/s on your CPU, but on our Model XYZ it will run around 300-400 h/s!') Or will there be anything useful in helping me pick FPGAs? Because...I already looked, and holyfuckballs there are a shitload of FPGA models and makers and ohgod how do I pick from this literal shitstorm of models?!
  4. Are high memory FPGAs a thing? I saw some stuff on Intel's website that indicated they had a (very expensive) FPGA that also had DDR4 slots built in. That would solve the memory issue. Do I actually need that though? Would it be the case that even a cheap (~$100) FPGA would end up having enough cells to implement 1GB of memory? I don't really care if I end up having a massive grid of registers, apart from the fact that, well, logic not used for computation is wasted energy and silicon space. But maybe 1GB of memory ends up being super tiny on an FPGA? Again, I understand how to build 1GB of memory in circuits, but not on an FPGA or in silicon.
submitted by Kingdud to FPGA [link] [comments]

New to r/Tokenmining? click here for more in-depth info!

What is EIP:918?

EIP:918 is an Ethereum Improvement Proposal for standardizing mineable token distribution using Proof of Work.
The primary driver behind the standard is to address the very broken ICO model that currently plagues the Ethereum network. Token distribution via the ICO model and it’s derivatives has always been susceptible to illicit behavior by bad actors. New token projects are centralized by nature because a single entity must handle and control all of the initial coins and all of the the raised ICO money. By distributing tokens via an alternative ‘Initial Mining Offering’ (or IMO), the ownership of the token contract no longer belongs with the deployer at all and the deployer is ‘just another user.’ As a result, investor risk exposure utilizing a mined token distribution model is significantly diminished. This standard is intended to be standalone, allowing maximum interoperability with ERC20, ERC721, and future token standards.
The most effective economic side effect of Satoshi Nakamoto’s desire to secure the original Bitcoin network with Proof of Work hash mining was tethering the coin to real computing power, thereby removing centralized actors. Transitioning the responsibility of work back onto individual miners, government organizations have no jurisdiction over the operation of a pure mined token economy. Oversight is removed from an equation whereby miners are providing economic effort in direct exchange of a cryptographic commodity. This facilitates decentralized distribution and establishes all involved parties as stakeholders. The ERC918 standard allows projects to be funded through decentralized computing power instead of centralized, direct-fiat conversion.
The Ethereum blockchain in its current state exists as a thriving ecosystem which allows any individual to store immutable records in a permission-less, invulnerable and transparent manner. Recently, there have been proposals to mitigate some initial ICO investment risks through the introduction of the DAICO model that relies on timed and automated value transfers via the smart contract tapping mechanism. However, this does not align a token smart contract as a non-security and still has the potential to put investors at risk if not implemented carefully, relying on centralized actors to be fair and community intended. Allowing users of the network direct access to tokens by performing computations as a proof of work supplies allows any smart contract to distribute a token in a safe and controlled manner similar to the release of a commodity.
As of 2017, all Ethereum token distribution methods were flawed and susceptible to Sybil attacks. A Sybil attack is a form of computer security attack where one person pretends to be many people with multiple computer accounts in order to manipulate a system in a malicious way. ICOs and airdrops are highly susceptible to these type of attacks so there is no way to verify that all ERC20 tokens distributed by the deployer were doled out fairly or unfairly. Proof of Work distribution is resistant to Sybil attacks. This means that ERC918 tokens are among the first trustless Ethereum tokens in the world. The distribution of ERC918 tokens is fair because they are allotted via an open, decentralized mathematical algorithm (that anyone can view on the mainnet blockchain) and not a centralized human monarchy.
ERC918’s first incarnation (and inspiration) was the 0xBitcoin project that launched in early 2018. Since then, several projects have realized the standard in innovative and creative ways. Catether (0xCATE) erupted early and additionally mints payback tokens during transfer operations to offset gas costs. 0xGold and 0xLitecoin each implement the first on-chain merge-mining with 0xBitcoin and the Mineable Gem project extends the standard onto a non-fungible collectible artifacts, whereby each gem has a unique mining difficulty. The Mineable project is a newer initiative that provides users with the ability to create mineable ERC20 tokens on-chain without writing a line of code and includes a virtualized hashing artifact market that allows miners to purchase on-chain vGPUs to improve mining difficulty and rewards. (written by jlogelin) ​

MINING IN A NUTSHELL

0xBitcoin is a Smart Contract on the Ethereum network, and the concept of Token Mining is patterned after Bitcoin's distribution. Rather than solving 'blocks', work is issued by the contract, which also maintains a Difficulty which goes up or down depending on how often a Reward is issued. Miners can put their hardware to work to claim these rewards, in concert with specialized software, working either by themselves or together as a Pool. The total lifetime supply of 0xBitcoin is 21,000,000 tokens and rewards will repeatedly halve over time.
The 0xBitcoin contract was deployed by Infernal_Toast at Ethereum address: 0xb6ed7644c69416d67b522e20bc294a9a9b405b31
0xBitcoin's smart contract, running on the Ethereum network, maintains a changing "Challenge" (that is generated from the previous Ethereum block hash) and an adjusting Difficulty Target. Like traditional mining, the miners use the SoliditySHA3 algorithm to solve for a Nonce value that, when hashed alongside the current Challenge and their Minting Ethereum Address, is less-than-or-equal-to the current Difficulty Target. Once a miner finds a solution that satisfies the requirements, they can submit it into the contract (calling the Mint() function). This is most often done through a mining pool. The Ethereum address that submits a valid solution first is sent the 50 0xBTC Reward.
(In the case of Pools, valid solutions that do not satisfy the full difficulty specified by the 0xBitcoin contract, but that DO satisfy the Pool's specified Minimum Share Difficulty, get a 'share'. When one of the Miners on that Pool finds a "Full" solution, the number of shares each miner's address has submitted is used to calculate how much of the 50 0xBTC reward they will get. After a Reward is issued, the Challenge changes.
A Retarget happens every 1024 rewards. In short, the Contract tries to target an Average Reward Time of about 60 times the Ethereum block time. So (at the time of this writing):
~13.9 seconds \* 60 = 13.9 minutes
If the average Reward Time is longer than that, the difficulty will decrease. If it's shorter, it will increase. How much longer or shorter it was affects the magnitude with which the difficulty will rise/drop, to a maximum of 50%. * Click Here to visit the stats page~ (https://0x1d00ffff.github.io/0xBTC-Stats) to see recent stats and block times, feel free to ask questions about it if you need help understanding it.

MINING HARDWARE

Presently, 0xBitcoin and "Alt Tokens" can be mined on GPUs, CPUs, IGPs (on-CPU graphics) and certain FPGAs. The most recommended hardware is nVidia graphics cards for their efficiency, ubiquity and relatively low cost. As general rules, the more cores and the higher core frequency (clock) you can get, the more Tokens you will earn!
Mining on nVidia cards:
Mining on AMD cards:
Mining on IGPs (e.g. AMD Radeon and Intel HD Graphics):
Clocks and Power Levels:

MINING SOFTWARE AND DESCRIPTIONS

For the most up-to-date version info, download links, thread links and author contact information, please see this thread: https://www.reddit.com/0xbitcoin/comments/8o06dk/links_to_the_newestbest_miners_for_nvidia_amd/ Keep up to date for the latest speed, stability and feature enhancements!
COSMiC Miner by LtTofu:
SoliditySha3Miner by Amano7:
AIOMiner All-In-One GPU Miner:
TokenMiner by MVis (Mining-Visualizer):
"Nabiki"/2.10.4 by Azlehria:
~Older Miners: Older and possibly-unsupported miner versions can be found at the above link for historical purposes and specific applications- including the original NodeJS CPU miner by Infernal Toast/Zegordo, the '1000x' NodeJS/C++ hybrid version of 0xBitcoin-Miner and Mikers' enhanced CUDA builds.

FOR MORE INFORMATION...

If you have any trouble, the friendly and helpful 0xBitcoin community will be happy to help you out. Discord has kind of become 0xBTC's community hub, you can get answers the fastest from devs and helpful community members. Or message one of the community members on reddit listed below.
Links
submitted by GeoffedUP to Tokenmining [link] [comments]

BusyBeaver key derivation function

Edit 2015-05-10:
Thanks to feedback, I've been able to make a new, substantially improved version. See update here!
Original post:
I present BusyBeaver, a password-based key derivation function (PBKDF) which I believe to be original and new. BusyBeaver attempts to improve on lessons of the past, which I would summarize thusly:
BusyBeaver attempts to improve on this by continuing to be memory hungry, and furthermore resisting brute-forcing optimization by using an algorithm that is dynamic and unpredictable. It attempts to take advantage of what CPUs do well - serial execution of arbitrary code - in order to thwart optimizations that are made easier by code being static.
BusyBeaver operates as follows:
  1. Takes as input a key (salt) and a password.
  2. Uses provided inputs to generate a 64 kB block of data using SHA-256 and HMAC-SHA256.
  3. Interprets the block as byte code for a virtual machine where all inputs are valid as instructions and arguments. The instructions perform calculations and changes on the input block, using operations that preserve entropy (jumps, additions, rotations, substitutions, and XOR).
  4. The executed algorithm is unpredictable, but deterministically dependent on input.
  5. Processing stops when the requested number of operations have been executed.
  6. The final digest is produced as HMAC-SHA256 of the resulting 64 kB block.
BusyBeaver's C++ source code can be downloaded here:
BusyBeaver-20150506.zip Edit: There is a new version - see update
It is platform-agnostic, includes a test program, and comes with a permissive, free software license.
My implementation is parameterized by the number of operations to be executed. I find that a good value is on the order of 50,000 - 100,000. This makes it likely that most of the 64 kB block will be processed at least once, and ensures that execution is not dominated by SHA-256 used to initialize the block.
The full KDF, parameterized with 100,000 operations, executes in under 10 ms on my machine, of which about 20% is spent on SHA-256.
submitted by SushiAndWoW to crypto [link] [comments]

USB Bitcoin Miner - The Power of 1000's Computers - YouTube Olimex iCE40HX8K-EVB FPGA with VGA & Keyboard Demo [en] MULTIPLY YOUR BITCOINS 1000X SPEED USING THIS PROGRAM FPGA: Update Bitstream on Blackminer F1 Mini - including firmware / odocrypt sd update (DGB) crypto ETHlargement Creator SPILLS The Beans on FPGA Mining! OhGodAGirl Interview Part 01

3. Best Bitcoin mining software CGminer. Pros: Supports GPU/FPGA/ASIC mining, Popular (frequently updated). Cons: Textual interface. Platforms: Windows, Mac, Linux Going strong for many years, CGminer is still one of the most popular GPU/FPGA/ASIC mining software available. CGminer is a command line application written in C. It’s also cross platform, meaning you can use it with Windows ... In order to be a crypto miner, you need both special hardware and mining software. Without them, you won’t be able to connect your Bitcoin miners to the blockchain, or to the pool, if you are part of a Bitcoin mining pool.. Here we take a look and give you our recommendation on the best cryptocurrency mining software. The FPGA boards supported by BTCMiner (USB-FPGA Modules 1.15b and 1.15d, USB-FPGA Download Awesome Miner Software to manage and monitor Bitcoin and Litecoin mining. Supports 32-bit and 64-bit editions of Windows Vista, Windows 7, Windows 8.x and windows 10; requires microsoft .NET Framework 4.5 ( already included in Windows 8.x and Windows 10 ... Bitcoin mining software for ZTEX USB-FPGA Modules 1.15 . BTCMiner is an Open Source Bitcoin Miner for ZTEX USB-FPGA-Modules 1.15b and 1.15d and USB-FPGA-Modules 1.15x. The latter variant is optimized for cryptographic computations such as Bitcoin Mining and allows to build up FPGA clusters using standard components (USB cables and USB hubs). Bitcoin miner software with multi-threaded multi-pool gpu, fpga and asic mining support. Bitcoins are a digital currency, exchanged freely against all other currencies. coins may be issued by everyone, one just needs considerable computer power - and luck. to even out rewards for one's contribution, many initiative have forms to provide pools ...

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USB Bitcoin Miner - The Power of 1000's Computers - YouTube

You will learn the steps in the standard FPGA design flow, how to use Intel Altera’s Quartus Prime Development Suite to create a pipelined multiplier, and how to verify the integrity of the ... An Arduino Leonardo compatible set to 3.3V (Olimexino-32U4) shows up on COM5 (in my case) and is connected via UEXT cable to the FPGA. In Cmd.exe in Windows 10 in Downloads-folder: winiceprogduino ... fpga for bitcoin mining windows bitcoin mining bitcoin mining cal define bitcoin mining ... bitcoin software download bitcoin wallet bitcoin miner bitcoin mining bitcoin miner software. In this interview, Kristy drops some knowledge on ASIC resistance, the current state of FPGA mining development, the outlook for GPUs in the near and mid-term, and then a sneak peek at a project ... fpga for bitcoin mining windows bitcoin mining bitcoin mining cal ... bitcoin software download bitcoin wallet bitcoin miner bitcoin mining bitcoin miner software BTCRobot BTC Robot

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