Bitcoin Core - Desktop - Windows - Choose your wallet ...

Bitcoin - The Currency of the Internet

A community dedicated to Bitcoin, the currency of the Internet. Bitcoin is a distributed, worldwide, decentralized digital money. Bitcoins are issued and managed without any central authority whatsoever: there is no government, company, or bank in charge of Bitcoin. You might be interested in Bitcoin if you like cryptography, distributed peer-to-peer systems, or economics. A large percentage of Bitcoin enthusiasts are libertarians, though people of all political philosophies are welcome.
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ZOIN / NOIR Digital Currency with Anonymity Features

ZOIN/NOIR is a decentralized digital currency to use for your secure, private, and untraceable transactions. The technology is based on Zerocoin Protocol to offer you complete Anonymity. You are your own bank. Our goal is that your privacy remains confidential.
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The place for everything bitcoin!

Bitcoin is the currency of the Internet: a distributed, worldwide, decentralized digital money. Unlike traditional currencies such as dollars, bitcoins are issued and managed without any central authority whatsoever: there is no one in charge of bitcoin and it is made up of willing participants. Bitcoin gives you the option to be your own bank.
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How to use Bitcoin Core only?

I'm wondering how one would restore a wallet that was made from a BIP39 seed to a Bitcoin Core wallet? Bitcoin Core does not use BIP39. So I presume you'd have to provide it the master private key.. but what is that exactly? Because on Ian Coleman's BIP39 utility website.... it shows BIP32 Root Key, Account Extended Private Key, and BIP32 Extended Private key... they are all different... which one would work to use in Bitcoin Core?
How would one backup their Bitcoin Core wallet private key? Is there an applicable mnemonic? Or is it just the private key?
Does Core work with QR codes? (Reading and Generating?)
submitted by SatoshiThreepwoodMP to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

DEMO: How To use Bitcoin Core (BTC)

DEMO: How To use Bitcoin Core (BTC) submitted by Egon_1 to btc [link] [comments]

How to use Bitcoin Core with ColdCard?

I setup with Electrum and read how to sign (approve) transactions without plugging in my hardware wallet to the computer directly.
But I also saw the option to export my wallet's setup to Bitcoin Core. I'd rather use a full node than depend/trust someone else as is the case with Electrum.
I don't see on YouTube or elsewhere how to go back and forth between my hardware wallet's SD card and Bitcoin Core on my laptop to sign transactions. Can anyone point me to rhe self-help how-to resources for this, please?
submitted by cooriah to coldcard [link] [comments]

Tutorial: How To Use Bitcoin Core (BTC)

Tutorial: How To Use Bitcoin Core (BTC) submitted by Egon_1 to btc [link] [comments]

In Mac system, how to use wallet.dat to recover bitcoin core old addresses & balance?

In Mac system, how to use wallet.dat to recover bitcoin core old addresses & balance?
submitted by Jo_ddit to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

I Did It! I figured out how to use Bitcoin. I am downloading Bitcoin Core Wal. but have not used it yet. I have never used bitcoin. While it installs, I installed Electrum on my Mac & bought $4 of bit on CashApp & moved to My Wallet on Electrum. I lost like 11cents on $4.13. It there a cheaper way?

I Did It! I figured out how to use Bitcoin. I am downloading Bitcoin Core Wal. but have not used it yet. I have never used bitcoin. While it installs, I installed Electrum on my Mac & bought $4 of bit on CashApp & moved to My Wallet on Electrum. I lost like 11cents on $4.13. It there a cheaper way? submitted by jeremyhunt1995 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

How to run Bitcoin Core 0.20.0 on Ubuntu Server 20.04 LTS using a Raspberry Pi 4 (or Virtual Machine)

I was helping someone on twitter with this so I figured I'd share the information here as well so that other people would have an easier time than I did.
I'm going to explain how to do this setup on a Raspberry Pi, but note that this should work on a VM as well. You can also set up and run the node headless this way, but I will be explaining how to set up the node using a monitor that you can then later disconnect and access remotely once everything is setup.
Hardware:
-Raspberry Pi 4 (2GB RAM minimum) preferably 4GB RAM -Raspberry Pi 4 Heatsinks -Raspberry Pi 4 case -Micro HDMI cable -USB-C power cable and wall adapter -Monitor -Keyboard and mouse -Ethernet cable (Optional) -16GB or larger microSD card -500GB or larger external hard drive (SSD or portable)
Node Requirements: -50 KBps upload internet speeds (Most people should have this) -Unlimited or high data cap internet download/upload service -6 hours or longer per day dedicated run time
Okay, once you have the hardware its time to get started!
The first thing you'll need to do is install the Raspberry Pi imager, this is how we're going to install Ubuntu onto our Raspberry Pi. After your download and install finishes, open the imager.
  1. Click the "choose OS" box and from the list select Ubuntu, then select Ubuntu Server 20.04 LTS (Raspberry Pi 2/3/4).
  2. Insert your microSD card to your computer directly or via a USB converter. Click "choose SD card" and select your inserted microSD card.
  3. Click "Write" and wait for the imager to finish flashing the OS onto your card
When it is done, remove the SD card and reinsert it to access the files installed. You can choose the overclock the Raspberry Pi by editing the config file. To connect to the Raspberry Pi remotely, you'll need to create an SSH file. If you're on windows this is pretty easy. In the File Explorer, highlight the address bar at the top, erase the text and type cmd, press enter and the Command Prompt will pop up. Type the following:
echo\ssh
This will create an SSH file in your SD directory so that you can remote access the Rasberry Pi later. Now you can go ahead and eject the SD card from your computer.
Now we can set up the Raspberry Pi
Go ahead and connect all your peripherals to your Raspberry Pi, insert the microSD, and connect it to power to turn it on. Give it a moment to boot up, then when prompted enter "ubuntu" for the password. It will make you change the password. Afterward, it will print a bunch of information to the screen, write down the IPv4 address, this is the IP address you'll use to remote access the Raspberry Pi. Now, at any time you can remote access your Raspberry Pi by entering a terminal on another PC in your network and typing:
ssh [email protected](your IP address)
The next step is to install a desktop. There are plenty to choose from so feel free to use a different one than what I use, you can also choose to ignore this and to just work from in the terminal from this point forward.
You need to update all the repositories so type: (Note you'll either have to be connected by ethernet or have edited the network-config file to setup your wifi in advance)
sudo apt-get update
Once it's done updating type the following to upgrade your system:
sudo apt-get upgrade
Now that you're up-to-date, you can install the desktop using the command:
sudo apt-get install ubuntu-gnome-desktop
This will take a while to download and install so just sit back and let it do its thing. Once it's done downloading, restart your Raspberry Pi and log in with the password you changed earlier. Your first boot may take a while so just be patient, don't freak out if you see a single purple square in the center of the screen while it's loading. You should now have the Ubuntu desktop ready to go and now it's on to installing Bitcoin Core!
Installing Bitcoin Core 0.20.0
Since we're running Ubuntu Server 20.04 LTS, it should come preinstalled with the Snap Store. This makes installing apps very easy and works similar to pip install in Python. Simply open your terminal and type:
sudo snap install bitcoin-core
This will install Bitcoin Core into your Snap folder and will add the application to your system. Unfortunately, there are still a few steps left before we can begin downloading the blockchain. By default, Bitcoin Core doesn't have the removable-media Plug connected to the Socket. You can view this by typing:
snap connections bitcoin-core
This means when you try installing everything onto your external hard drive, Bitcoin Core won't be able to identify it or write to it even when passed the directory path. To fix this first locate your Snap folder, make a copy of the bitcoin-core folder inside, and paste it into your external drive.
NOTE: You must make a copy, you can't just move the snap file to the external drive.
Now, you can connect the removable-media Plug to the Socket by typing:
sudo snap connect bitcoin-core:removable-media :removable-media
This gives you the read/write permissions necessary to access the /media path. Finally, you can now launch Bitcoin Core and select "use a custom directory path" when prompted. Highlight the current directory path and replace it with the path to your external hard drive, it should look something like this:
/media/(external drive)/bitcoin-core/common/.bitcoin
This is why we had to make a copy of the bitcoin-core folder to the external drive earlier, the Bitcoin Core application will create the new data directory through ".bitcoin". Hit "Okay" and the application will begin synchronizing with the network! Once the synchronization is finished your very own node will be up and running!
EDIT: (08/01/2020) Bitcoin Core 0.20.01 has been released, I will update the tutorial soon with how to run the latest release.
submitted by Noblefire_62 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Brian Hoffman: "People suggesting that Facebook use Bitcoin [Core] instead of Libra is kind of confusing to me. I mean even if Lightning scales to their level, how could they support peer to peer payments without addressing the invoice-less payments issue? This seems prohibitive (not insurmountable)

Brian Hoffman: submitted by Egon_1 to btc [link] [comments]

Olivier Janssens: "To the Bitcoin Core people: Transaction fees are rising fast. How will people with less money (or doing small transactions) be able to use their own private wallets instead of being forced on exchanges and centralized solutions? (Not Lightning. Same fees to open channels & alpha)"

Olivier Janssens: submitted by money78 to btc [link] [comments]

What makes the Core operatives & twitter-animals tremble the most? The exact use-case they worked so hard to kill; adoption. Here is this sockpuppet vote-manipulated to try and harm Bitcoin’s (BCH) growth exactly like how they murdered it the first time by killing BTC. Harming adoption. Fuck off.

What makes the Core operatives & twitter-animals tremble the most? The exact use-case they worked so hard to kill; adoption. Here is this sockpuppet vote-manipulated to try and harm Bitcoin’s (BCH) growth exactly like how they murdered it the first time by killing BTC. Harming adoption. Fuck off. submitted by wisequote to btc [link] [comments]

Jimmy Song was completely stumped when Roger asked him to provide a bitcoin address. It's weird how none of these Core guys actually use bitcoin.

Jimmy Song was completely stumped when Roger asked him to provide a bitcoin address. It's weird how none of these Core guys actually use bitcoin. submitted by Shaolinfish to btc [link] [comments]

Bitfinex’ed: "Even some Whalepool [Core minions] scammers are disgusted by Tether using the reserves to buy Bitcoin. You have to wonder how many traders got liquidated because Tether raided funds from Tether to market buy the entire orderbook to liquidate them."

Bitfinex’ed: submitted by Egon_1 to btc [link] [comments]

Peter Rizun: "Don't worry @bloXrouteLabs, they used to call Bitcoin Unlimited's Xthin block propagation a scam…then not important…then when they realized how well it worked they copied us and named it Compact Blocks. As @giacomozucco so elegantly put it: if it ain't Core, it's a scam."

Peter Rizun: submitted by Egon_1 to btc [link] [comments]

How do I use my bitcoin core node to validate transactions against BRD, HODL, Samourai or other mobile wallets???

I have my bitcoin core node setup. I use electrum personal server and can connect electrum to my own core node just fine. However, all of these mobile wallets that allow you to "switch to manual mode" and use your own bitcoin core node dont seem to work. Some allow you to put in your RPC Username/Password and others just allow you to put in an IP and a Port. I am obviously connecting via my own local LAN between my phone and the core node. I have server=1 set in my config and I have an RPC usepassword/port setup as well. What else needs to be done here or does anyone have any tips/tricks to get this to work? Thanks.
submitted by linkd22 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Do you want to use command line for Bitcoin core? See how to do it

Do you want to use command line for Bitcoin core? See how to do it submitted by PetarMG to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Hey so I bought bitcoin in 2018 and I think I used bitcoin core or something and I have a wallet with $200 worth of bitcoin sitting on my desktop, can someone please help me figure out how to transfer this onto an online wallet such as blockchain or Coin base

Hey so I bought bitcoin in 2018 and I think I used bitcoin core or something and I have a wallet with $200 worth of bitcoin sitting on my desktop, can someone please help me figure out how to transfer this onto an online wallet such as blockchain or Coin base submitted by bucxi to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

What is Neutrino and what advantages and capabilities will it add to Bitcoin Core? Also any ideas as to when we might see this in use and how might it be added to the core software, will it need miner voting?

submitted by kolinHall to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Shapeshift.io Video Tutorial: How to Use Wallet.Bitcoin.com to Exchange Bitcoin Core to Bitcoin Cash

Shapeshift.io Video Tutorial: How to Use Wallet.Bitcoin.com to Exchange Bitcoin Core to Bitcoin Cash submitted by BitcoinXio to btc [link] [comments]

How soon will buy.bitcoin.com offer BCH? I don't want to use an exchange and I don't want to shapeshift BTC core

submitted by terinbune to btc [link] [comments]

"we as a community should indeed let a fee market develop, and rather sooner than later." - Pieter Wuille -- so goodbye to all the original bitcoin use cases, transactions, satoshi dice, money for the unbanked. How stupid are these core people?!

submitted by Windowly to btc [link] [comments]

12-30 21:33 - 'That's not true. The core has more features than electrum- it just requires use of the CLI. Honestly, you shouldn't be using multi-sig in the first place if you can't figure out how to generate an address using the CLI...' by /u/Nycmdthroaway removed from /r/Bitcoin within 43-53min

'''
That's not true. The core has more features than electrum- it just requires use of the CLI. Honestly, you shouldn't be using multi-sig in the first place if you can't figure out how to generate an address using the CLI.
Open up the debug window CLI tab, type `help' and you'll see how much you can do and the information you can ascertain with the core node that you can't with electrum.
Electrum relies on the core node for all of its functionality, save their proprietary mnemonic seed backup algorithm, which is much less secure than BIP33 (which can be generated with the core; electrum literally provides you with the dictionary to carry out an attack on its addresses, and it doesn't use an EC in its cryptographic process, meaning the encryption entropy is low and the nonces are predictable).
I could order some RIPEMD-160 ASIC chips for $2/piece and have a Chinese fabricator design a PCB using some cheap 22nm SHA-256 chips and the RIPEMD chips, replace cgminer or bfgminer's computational sections with the ultra optimized vanitygen algos for brute forcing priv keys, switch out stratum for JTR-style threaded rainbow tables based on a few hundred thousand rounds of mnemonic generation using electrum's suite- along with some open source code analysis, and in a month I could create a machine that could generate and test hundreds of thousands to millions of mnemonics per second.
The only reason this hasn't been an active practice is because destroying bitcoins keypair-cryptography (or at least appearing to have done so) would send the price under a dollar in 24hours. An update would be patched within a few days and it should be a lot of hard work for nothing. But I wouldn't be surprised if this is occurring actively on a small scale, with old addresses presumed to be "lost." Even if an active address was hit, as long as it wasn't overdone, people would shrug it off as a physical compromise of their own network/machine/software, not an epidemic- but considering the frequency of exchanges getting "hacked" and the actual ease by which the attack could be carried out, I think there's an equal possibility that the security is already completely compromised.
Theoretically all mnemonic backups are inherently insecure (as is any password using dictionary words, no matter how long) but at least using ECDHE and a deterministic seed, you're actually getting a password with a strength equal to that of the sum of its characters as ASCI to BASE/56 encoded bits. Without that, you may as well have a 12 character passphrase (with the possible characters equal to the number of words in the abridged electrum dictionary.) So it's {POSSIBLE WORDS}12 for electrum vs. something closer to {(POSSIBLE WORDS60)(POSSIBLE HD-SEEDS)}256 for a BIP33 mnemonic using SecP256k ECDHE algo (assuming average number of letters in a word are 5 and HD seeds are pseudo-random.) But mnemonic seeds are still insecure even with BIP33. Use the core wallet and you get a key with true randomness using entropy from blockchain derived sources, 2 rounds of SHA-256 and a final RIPEMD-160 round with a 256-Bit secret generated in conjunction with with an extremely secure ECDHE curve=trillions upon trillions of possibilities. That not only makes a single key harder to break, it means there is a much less likely chance of someone randomly guessing secrets and testing them to see if they come out to a funded address in the whole scheme of things.
It's like if I tried to break into every Dell server. If many people were using weak passwords, and I could try a password on all of them at the same time- I'd surely crack a bunch, and make Dell look bad as a company, even though the servers were inherently fine. Keeping the network strong means making sure you do your part to save face, after all bitcoin is owned and CONTROLLED by the userbase.
As a side note, RIPEMD was only used in the public scheme along with SHA256 (despite being significantly weaker) because at the time SHA256 was the only widely implemented and highly secure algorithm- meaning it could be as widely adopted and widely mined as possible. So SHA-256 was the logical choice for the main block algorithm. There wasn't another option for the wallet address' scheme that would be secure tunneling enough and still computationally feasible and easy to integrate. So SHA-256 was most secure, but without the round of RIPEMD-160 as the deterministic round, wallets could be brute forced at the same time as mining, with the same hardware.
For the most secure, fool-proof, uncrackable wallet, here's what I do/used to do: Use the Core node to bake Segwit P2SH addresses. I don't use HD wallets period, but HD is secure enough as long as you're using a truly random secret. Remember that the secret in a BIP33 HD wallet is the master privkey, additionally, each address has it's own xpriv, which, considering the combinations possible, saving the individual xprivs makes the most sense anyway. If you plan on spending the coins soon, just secure the wallet .dat file with a strong 16+ character (A-Z,a-z,()$&@#$/?¿%÷,0-9) passphrase (this is just the wallet file pw it has nothing to do with your addresses) then just throw the wallet on a flash drive or better yet an SD card or 2 and call it a day.
For addresses you plan to put on ice for a while, concat your coins into a handful of accounts, don't store more than $1,000/address. Then using the `dumpprivkey' Core CLI command (I think that's the command, it's something like that, type help and you'll see it if I'm wrong), a text encrypting program (for good measure) and a barcode/QR code generator (all offline!), get the private keys for each address, encrypt the text with an easy to remember password (you'll be taking the keys offline, and storing physically, so no need to worry too much about that pass, it's better to just keep them physically safe), and then generate QR codes for each. Paste them all into a word doc with the corresponding (lightly) encrypted numbers you generated the QRs with. Print out a couple copies and then delete the addresses from the wallet.
Put those paper wallets somewhere safe. You could also split the key down the middle and store the 2 parts of the paper wallets in different places instead of encrypting the plaintext xprivs. So you'd need to scan both paper keys and paste the solutions together to access the coins.
That's all a bit extreme... in reality, unless you're super paranoid and storing millions, you'll be fine by keeping your coins in the core node with decent firewall and a good .dat passphrase.
BUT ELECTRUM IS NO GOOD!
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Author: Nycmdthroaway
submitted by removalbot to removalbot [link] [comments]

Some of the great examples how the Bitcoin community can make some bitcoin products even better. Now, what can be done to make Bitcoin Core better, faster and cheaper to use?

Some of the great examples how the Bitcoin community can make some bitcoin products even better. Now, what can be done to make Bitcoin Core better, faster and cheaper to use? submitted by carlosbit to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

How to Start Using Bitcoin in Five Easy Steps - YouTube How to install Bitcoin Core Wallet and send Bitcoins How to mine bitcoins (solo mining) with the core client ... 2018 03 04 How to Use the Bitcoin Core Wallet Part 1 BITCOIN FOR BEGINNERS!  CRYPTOCURRENCIES FOR BEGINNERS ...

What is Bitcoin core?. Bitcoin Core is a wallet for storing Bitcoins. This is a full node of the bitcoin network and it is the so-called heavy type wallet. This means that to run the wallet on your computer, you must first download the entire chain to your computer. Bitcoin Core is programmed to decide which block chain contains valid transactions. The users of Bitcoin Core only accept transactions for that block chain, making it the Bitcoin block chain that everyone else wants to use. For the latest developments related to Bitcoin Core, be sure to visit the project’s official website. Bitcoin Core runs as a full network node and maintains a local copy of the block chain. This data independence improves wallet privacy and security. Unlike some SPV wallets that leak addresses to peers, Bitcoin Core stores all transactions locally.With local access to the complete set of headers and transactions, Bitcoin Core can use full verification to tell when peers lie about payments. Bitcoin Core is the "official" wallet for Bitcoin, but it may be frustrating due to its lack of features and slow processing speeds. However, it does offer better security and privacy because it doesn't rely on external servers and all transactions are routed through Tor. Bitcoin Core has developed to a reliable, fast and feature rich Bitcoin wallet and it is getting more features with every release. It stores the whole blockchain on the user’s hard drive giving ...

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How to Start Using Bitcoin in Five Easy Steps - YouTube

Downloading and syncing the Bitcoin Core Wallet. World's Most Famous Hacker Kevin Mitnick & KnowBe4's Stu Sjouwerman Opening Keynote - Duration: 36:30. Cyber Investing Summit Recommended for you http://www.voicesofliberty.com/article/5-easy-steps-to-get-started-using-bitcoin/ Bitcoin is an open-source cryptographic currency that uses peer-to-peer tec... In this tutorial we are going to get our private keys from the bitcoin core wallet. This only works when you created the bitcoin address in the same wallet. ... 1) Get the Bitcoin Core: https://bitcoin.org/en/choose-your-wa... 2) Download the entire blockchain. 3) Watch this video ;) (setgenerate true = start mining, setgenerate false = stop mining ... --~-- This is a bitcoin for beginners video! We will discuss cryptocurrencies for beginners so you know the basics! Enjoy! * My Stock Market Investing Strate...

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